Eusebius of Caesarea

Onomasticon, 295 AD

The tradition associated with Gethsemane is very ancient. Eusebius, in his “Onomasticon” of biblical places (295 AD), cited Gethsemane, indicating that it was at the foot of the Mount of Olives, “and even today the faithful flock there to pray”.

In about 390, St. Jerome translated Eusebius’ Onomasticon into Latin and added to the text a reference to the church that had been built at the place where Jesus had gone to pray before his passion.

Jerome’s testimony is important for dating the construction of Gethsemane: he was writing at a time when the church, which Egeria had already visited, was being completed. His evidence, together with that of the pilgrim, has led historians to believe that the church at Gethsemane was built between the beginning of the reign of Theodosius (379-393 AD) and the end of the episcopate of Cyril of Jerusalem (348-386 AD).-386 AD).

Eusebius of Caesarea
Onomasticon– Greek version - (295 AD)

«Gethsimane. Choríon, éntha prò toû páthous ho Christòs proseúxato. Keîtai dè kaì pròs to ôrei ton elaion en ho kaì nyn tàs euchàs hoi pistoì poieîsthai spoudázousin.»

Gethsemane. The place where Christ prayed before the Passion. It is located at the foot of the Mount of Olives and even today the faithful flock there to pray.

Jerome
De situ et nominibus locorum Hebraicorum, Latin translation - (c. 390 AD)

«Gethsemani, locus ubi Salvator ante passionem oravit. Est autem ad radices montis Oliveti nunc ecclesia desuper ædificata.»

Gethsemane. The place where the Savior prayed before the Passion. It is located at the foot of the Mount of Olives, and now a church has been built over it.

Patrologia Latina, vol. 23, col. 950